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Stalk your Professor

First, we will take a look at Professor Mary Abdoney and her digital footprint. A Florida native born in 1977 and attended H.B. Plant High School. Following that, Professor Abdoney studied at the University of Florida earning a Bachelor of Arts in Anthropology in 1999. She returned to school at University of South Florida and received a Master of Library and Information Science in 2001. This led her to become an Associate Professor and Research and Instruction Coordinator at Washington and Lee. She earned tenure after 6 years of vigilant work in 2012. From the numerous posts on various platforms, she loves anything and everything that has to do with libraries, so her job suits her very well. On her twitter, viewers can come to the conclusion that she is an avid feminist, anti-racist, Elizabeth Warren supporting, liberal woman. She has a husband and a marriage of equality with both her and her husband contributing in different ways. She often can be found advocating for the LGBTQ+ community and the dismantling of the patriarchy. Outside of politics, she truly enjoys her desserts, Legos, gardening, and knitting/sewing. She has a cat and definitely provides her followers with a lot of cat content. 

Professor Elizabeth Teaff: 

Next up is Professor Elizabeth Teaff. She hails from Columbus, Ohio and was born in 1974. No surprise here but she is an Ohio State fan (thank you Facebook!). She attended Gloversville High School and then went on to study Library & Information Science at the University of South Carolina at Columbia, the State University of New York at Potsdam, and then Studied Studio Art at Fulton–Montgomery Community College. This led her to become an associate professor and Head of Access Services. She also is a part of the Digital Culture and Information (DCI) Program, and Research and Instruction Services. In addition to all of this, she is the Liaison for Art, Art History, Film Studies, and Theatre & Dance at Washington and Lee. She began working here in 2003. She thoroughly enjoys nature, especially flowers. She is not married but she does own a cat. Politically, Professor Teaff does not reveal much but from her Facebook viewers can learn that she is an LGBTQ+ ally.  

This blog post was super interesting to write because it really made me realize how much the internet stores about each person. It made me think of our digital footprint readings and I thought it was interesting to see how big or small a footprint can be. Professor Abdoney has left an incredibly large digital footprint of herself on the internet. You can find almost everything about her through her Instagram, LinkedIn, blog, and Facebook. Professor Teaff on the other hand has a smaller digital footprint. Obviously, she has plenty of information about herself, but it is mainly basic milestone information. It doesn’t contain as many personal thoughts as feelings. 

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One Day Of Web Interactions

I wake up and immediately reach for my phone. The thought doesn’t even cross my mind; it is just an instinct at this point. I aimlessly scrolled through various social media platforms attempting to stay updated on the new gossip or whereabouts of my friends far away from Lexington, VA. On weekends, this is about 30 minutes of responding to and sending snapchats, reading texts about breakfast and the plan for the day, and scrolling through mindless posts on Instagram and Tik Tok in bed. As unproductive as this is, it is a staple part of the weekend morning routine. From there, the internet usage took a backseat because of my interactions with other people. The occasional snapchat or text was sent but not a primary focus for the rest of the morning. The afternoon was a very different situation, though. Especially in this day and age, the emphasis on using the internet for coursework is exponentially high. I practically spent all afternoon on my computer. First, I tackled my geology assignments. I used canvas to access videos from my professor on the online platform YUJA. Once I finished watching those, I took my leftover questions to the internet and ended up reading up about mineral cleavage and watching YouTube videos on the differences between covalent and ionic bonds. Here, the internet served as a source of additional information. After that, I was reading eBooks for DCI and writing discussion questions on Padlet- another internet platform. My Spanish work also was all online on the Vista Higher Learning program. The assignment included an online clip of a news broadcast and some Spanish vocabulary. Even though this seems like a lot of time on the internet already, most of it isn’t close to being done. Following all of that, I had to take a geology quiz and write this blog post- both online.  Once, all the work was done I stayed up late facetiming my friend, continuing the mindless scrolling and watching some Netflix. With about 80% of my schoolwork online, I have access to so many great resources and can participate from basically anywhere. These are some of the positives, but I also have access to online distractions. What I included during the “homework” part of my afternoon, didn’t cover all my internet time. I am missing out on the many snapchats, texts, online shopping, and email breaks that came up and set me off course. On one hand, it is great to have so much at the tip of our fingers. I couldn’t have gotten through my geology work without the help of crash course and other more in-depth online explanations. On the other hand though, I have to argue that all of these additional online distractions not only prevent me from getting my work done more efficiently and quickly, but they also cause me to stay up later and develop a poor sleep schedule. All my procrastination is on me; I am not denying that. I do, however, think that it creates a much more difficult environment for me to do my work! 

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